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Android Lollipop (5.0.2) Update

Android Lollipop
After a gruelling 2 hours, my OS was updated. I had updated my Moto G 2nd Generation's OS from Android KitKat (Android 4.4.4) to the latest Android Lollipop (Android 5.0.2).
After downloading the 350+ MB OS, I couldn't wait to see the new user interface and OS. I had read excellent reviews online since the OS had been released to other parts of the world before it was released in India on 23rd January, 2015.

Lock Screen:
The minute my phone had switched off and switched on I could clearly see the differences.

Since I had left my phone for over 2 hours I had many notifications.The notifications appeared on the lock screen, just like in an iPhone. On the bottom left corner of the screen you can directly go to the dialer by dragging the phone icon and then keying in the password. On the bottom right corner, you can drag the camera icon and directly open your camera. Just like previous versions, photos clicked by the owner of the phone cannot be seen unless the phone is unlocked. If your phone is charging, on the lock screen you will be able to see how long it will take till the battery is full.


Home Screen:
Once you unlock your phone and reach the home screen, you realise that the home screen isn't that different compared to the previous version. The only differences are that:
  • The Google search option bar is redesigned.
  • There is a redesigned menu button.
  • Many inbuilt applications have been redesigned. 
 Inbuilt Applications:
Most inbuilt apps like Email, music and google chrome have had a slight makeover. In settings there are a few new options such as multi-user, Cast screen etc.

Pull Down (Control Panel):
The New Pull Down Option (Control Panel)
In the older version, we could open the control panel by dragging our finger from the top of the screen to the bottom. In this version when we do that, it opens notifications and also a completely new control panel. The control panel has consists of most of the old features like WiFi, Airplane Mode, Location services, etc. In this version, we can directly switch on and off the WiFi, Airplane Mode, location services etc.



Cast Screen:
Cast Screen is a new option in this OS (atleast in the Moto G 2). Using this option, we can instantly show a copy of our screen on our computer/ TV. To do this one must download the Chromecast App both on the laptop and phone. One must download it onto the laptop since we can show our phone's screen on our TV only through our computer.
After downloading these apps, we must buy the  Chromecast Streaming Media Player to connect our phone to the Laptop/ computer. We can buy this on Flipkart for Rs 2,999.
For more information as to how to connect the phone to the laptop, click here.

New Keyboard
Keyboard:
The new keyboard consists of a white background. I personally like the new keyboard.


Multiple Users:
 Android L can now accommodate multiple users on your phone. You can now lend your phone to your friend without worrying that he/ she will look at your personal texts, pictures etc. To add users follow the following instructions:
  • Go to settings.
  • Click on users.
  • Click on guest. 
  • Your user ID will be changed. The guest won't be able to call anyone unless you activate the calling option for the guest. In the guest ID none of your applications will be shown. Only the built in apps will be shown.
 An Interesting game:
Android Lollipop's 'Hidden' Game
Android L has released a hidden game that does not appear in the form of icons. To play the game follow the instructions given below:
  • Go to settings.
  • Click on About Phone.
  • Click about 7-10 times on Version number.
  • Your screen will change and a lollipop will appear on your screen.
  • Keep holding your screen for about two seconds. 
  • The game will open.
In older versions, if you do the same thing, you will get something interesting. Try it out yourself! No spoilers!

 Battery Saver:
A new feature in Android 5 is the battery saver option. When you switch on the battery saver option, the processor speed becomes slower. Therefore your phone also becomes slower. In critical situations when you are not near a power supply and you need to constantly use your phone for something or the other this feature is really useful. 

 There are many more features which have not been added to this blog post since I thought that it was not necessary.

The Android L is a really interesting and sophisticated software which is full of surprises. I suggest that you install this software. For a badly done menu and the costly cast screen option, I award the new OS 4/5 stars.

Look out for my next post: Difference between Android L (5.0.2) and Android K (4.4.4)! It is going to be an article mainly consisting of pictures. It will come out before 10th February, 2014.



Comments

  1. The Multiple Users feature is cool. This makes the device shareable between multiple users and it is especially handy in a country like India -or in situations where a single phone may be used by businesses and more than one user uses it in shifts etc.

    Does it allow selective access to certain feeatures that may want to be commonly accessed by every user?

    Is there an admin login?

    - Rakesh Rao

    ReplyDelete
  2. All applications can be logged into by using a new Google ID. Apps that are downloaded by the main user will not be shown on a guest user's screen. Photos can also cannot be accessed. The main user can select wether or not he/she wants to allow guest user to access the phone. Contacts won't be shared too. When the main user decides to log into to his/her ID, he/she will have to change the user ID and also type in the password if one is present. Otherwise, there is no difference between a guest user and the main user option as the guest user can also log in to the main user's ID.

    ReplyDelete

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